Understanding FR-44 Insurance in Florida and Virginia

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Elijah Black is a Greenville, South Carolina native with a B.A. English from Coastal Carolina University. He is a fiction writer and also works as a freelance writer and editor. He’s worked as a Production Assistant for WYFF 4 and has been published in several publications...

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Rachael Brennan has been working in the insurance industry since 2006 when she began working as a licensed insurance representative for 21st Century Insurance, during which time she earned her Property and Casualty license in all 50 states. After several years she expanded her insurance expertise, earning her license in Health and AD&D insurance...

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Reviewed byRachael Brennan
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UPDATED: Apr 23, 2020

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It goes without saying — the decision to drink and drive is life-altering.

And for those convicted of a DUI, they face a complex set of legal and financial challenges ranging from jail time to difficulty finding car insurance coverage to skyrocketing premiums.

But there’s more.

In most states, drivers with DUI convictions must submit documentation proving that they’ve met their state’s car insurance requirements. For those living in Florida or Virginia, that required documentation is called an FR-44.

Securing an FR-44 is a crucial step that cannot be overlooked or missed. It’s why we’ve set out to break down everything Florida and Virginia drivers requiring an FR-44 need to know — including important DUI laws, surprising statistics, and car insurance options for high-risk drivers.

Your complete guide to understanding FR-44 Insurance starts here. You can begin shopping rates by entering your zip code into our free high-risk car insurance comparison tool.

What is FR-44 Insurance?

It’s simple. Every state requires drivers to carry auto liability insurance or another form of financial responsibility.

But for drivers who have been convicted of certain violations — such as Driving Under the Influence — certain state laws will ask for additional proof. This is known as a certificate of financial responsibility, the primary goal of which is to prove that the driver has taken financial responsibility and is in compliance with the state’s car insurance laws.

If the driver doesn’t maintain this coverage, their insurer must notify the state, and drivers will face consequences.

For most states, this certificate will come in the form of an SR-22. But where there’s a rule, there’s always an exception — and that’s in Florida and Virginia’s FR-44.

What’s the difference between an FR-44 and an SR-22?

Just like an SR-22, an FR-44  is not an insurance policy. Rather, it’s a court-mandated certificate that an insurer must file with a state’s Department of Motor Vehicles, Secretary of State, or another licensing authority.

But what truly sets a Florida or Virginia FR-44 apart is that it requires drivers to carry significantly higher amounts of liability insurance — far exceeding each state’s minimum requirements.

While there are many similarities in how FR-44s are administered in Florida and Virginia, there are also significant differences. We’re breaking down how FR-44 Insurance works in both states below.

How FR-44 Car Insurance Works in Florida

The year was 2007, and car insurance providers across Florida received this communication from state officials stating insurers would no longer file SR-22s on behalf of drivers who had DUI convictions after October 1, 2007. Rather, they would need to begin filing FR-44s.

Insurance companies now had a distinction between what violations called for an SR-22 and what called for an FR-44:

When Florida Drivers Need an SR-22When Florida Drivers Need an FR-44
- Unsatisfied judgment
- Driver license suspension as a result of a major conviction
- Point system suspension or habitual traffic offender revocation
- Uninsured automobile accidents that meet the reporting criteria
- Court conviction for no proof of insurance (PIP/PDL SR-22)
- DUI and Alcohol-Related Convictions
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Bottom line? Where Florida drivers with DUI convictions must have an FR-44 filed with their insurance, the following violations will call for an SR-22:

  • Receiving a legal judgment for an accident
  • Driver license suspensions in light of a major conviction
  • Too many violation points on your record
  • Getting into an accident while uninsured
  • A court conviction for not having proof of insurance

Though FR-44s haven’t been around very long, they carry a tremendous impact on the drivers who need them. Here’s a closer look at how Florida drivers with DUI convictions go about obtaining an FR-44.

How do I get an FR-44 in Florida?

Without question, a DUI conviction in the state of Florida will immediately result in significant legal and financial repercussions.

Aside from imprisonment, fines, and vehicle impoundment, drivers will also have their licenses suspended for a minimum of six months. Once their suspension period is over, drivers will need an FR-44 to get their driving privileges reinstated.

When it comes to who obtains the FR-44, that responsibility falls to your insurance provider. Initiating the process will begin with you contacting your provider and letting them know you need one to be filed on your behalf.

Florida FR-44 Form

Under Florida law, your provider must file the FR-44 form electronically with the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (DHSMV) within 15 working days of it being issued. The cost of filing an FR-44 typically ranges from $15 to $35 dollars.

Once the FR-44 is in place, it must remain on file with the state for three years.

A word of caution — with a DUI conviction, you’re now considered a “high-risk” driver. And though the cost of filing an FR-44 is minimal, the cost of maintaining car insurance as a high-risk driver is not.

Part of that increase will, in part, be due to the increased liability requirements you are now required to carry.

What are the FR-44 liability requirements in Florida?

The liability requirements under a Florida FR-44 are high, exponentially exceeding what is required of the typical Florida driver.

Here’s a breakdown of the coverage drivers will need to maintain:

Florida FR-44 Minimum Liability Auto Insurance Requirements
Types of Liability Coverage RequiredAmount of Liability Coverage Required
Bodily Injury Liability
$100,000 Bodily per person
$300,000 Bodily per accident
Property Damage Liability$50,000
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To clarify, the Florida FR-44 liability requirements are:

  • $100,000 in Bodily Injury Liability Coverage for costs associated with another person’s injuries or death in an accident that you caused, up to the policy’s limits.
  • $300,000 in Bodily Injury Liability per accident
  • $50,000 Property Damage Liability for property that was damaged in an accident that you caused.

These FR-44 limits are significant for a number of reasons: first, when we consider the state’s minimum requirements for drivers ($10,000 PIP and $10,000 PDL), bodily injury liability coverage is not required. While most will wisely argue that the addition of bodily injury liability coverage is smart for any driver, the point is this — these liability requirements surpass what just about every state requires.

Secondly, the liability requirements for an FR-44 are also much higher than those tied to an SR-22. Here’s a side-by-side comparison:

Florida SR-22
Minimum Liability Requirements
Florida FR-44
Minimum Liability Requirements
$10,000 Bodily Injury Liability per person
$20,000 Bodily Injury Liability per accident
$10,000 Property Damage Liability
$100,000 Bodily Injury Liability per person
$300,000 Bodily Injury Liability per accident
$50,000 Property Damage Liability
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This table clearly demonstrates that when compared to an SR-22, an FR-44 carries:

  • 10 times the bodily injury liability requirements per person ($100,000 for an FR-44 versus $10,000 for an SR-22)
  • 15 times the bodily injury liability requirements per accident ($300,000 versus $20,000)
  • Five times the property damage requirements ($50,000 versus $10,000)

Finally, drivers will need to remember that many Florida insurers will require those with an FR-44 to pay their premiums up front and in full.

According to the Law Dictionary, this is to “protect the financial health of the insurers that operate (in) the state and penalize DUI-convicted drivers in equal measure.” It’s only after the first renewal insurers may become more lenient and allow drivers to make monthly payments.

How much is FR-44 insurance in Florida?

For Florida drivers required to have an FR-44, increased costs don’t stop with the high liability insurance requirements.

Having a DUI on your record now makes you a “high-risk” driver. This will be enough cause for insurers to raise your rates by as much as 200 or 300 percent, or possibly enough to even drop you.

To get a better idea of what Florida drivers with DUI convictions are paying in car insurance premiums, we turn to data purchased from Quadrant. Here’s a look at what Florida drivers with one DUI conviction are paying compared to Florida drivers with a clean record:

Insurance ProviderClean RecordWith One DUI
Allstate$6,417.39$8,524.13
GEICO$2,636.72$5,012.72
Liberty Mutual$3,869.33$7,291.64
Nationwide$3,705.32$5,472.37
Progressive$4,407.95$5,490.35
State Farm$3,105.11$3,397.66
USAA$2,233.94$4,070.81
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From this data, we can make several key conclusions:

  • Florida drivers with DUIs are paying a very high price — as much as $8,500+ in premiums.
  • The highest average rates for Florida drivers with one DUI are with Allstate, at $8,524.13. On the flip side, the lowest average rates can be seen with USAA, at $4,070.81.
  • On average, drivers can expect to see a $1,840.56 increase (or a 53.6 percent hike) in rates as they go from having a clean record to one DUI.
  • Drivers facing the highest increase in rates are those insured with Liberty Mutual, at $3,422.31.
  • The company with the largest percent increase in rates is Geico. Drivers with one DUI conviction are paying a staggering 90.1 percent more in rates than their counterparts with clean records.
  • Conversely, the company with the smallest percent increase in rates is State Farm, at 9.4 percent. However, just one step above State Farm is Progressive, with a 24.5 percent increase over a clean record.

How long do you have to keep FR-44 insurance in Florida?

An FR-44 is to remain on file with the state for three years.

If you cancel your policy, or if there is a lapse in coverage, your insurer is legally required to contact the state.

Under state law, a lapse in policy will result in an automatic driver’s license suspension.

DUI Statistics in Florida

For the state of Florida, it’s a startling statistic.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that in 2017, Florida ranked third in the nation for alcohol-impaired driving fatalities.

But in turning to data provided by the Foundation for Advancing Alcohol Responsibility, we see another troubling trend — the number of alcohol-impaired driving fatalities per 100,000 people is higher in Florida than the national average.

Here’s a further breakdown of arrests, and fatality rates from the foundation:

DUIs in Florida: An OverviewDetails
Total DUI Arrests32,727 (Florida)
1,017,808 (National)
Alcohol-Impaired Driving Fatalities
per 100K population
4 (Florida)
3.4 (National)
Total Alcohol-Impaired Driving Fatalities
BAC = .08
839 (Florida)
10,874 (National)
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Theses figures show that in 2017,

  • More than 32,000 people were arrested for DUIs in Florida.
  • There were four alcohol-impaired driving fatalities per 100,000 people in the state, higher than the national average of 3.4 fatalities per 100,000 people.
  • There were a total of 839 alcohol-impaired driving fatalities.

According to the NHTSA, drivers are considered too impaired when their blood alcohol concentration (BAC) is at .08 or higher. However, statistics from the administration prove that even at lower BAC levels, lives are still at risk.

Florida drivers with a BAC of .01 were involved in more fatal crashes than their counterparts with higher blood alcohol concentrations.

Here’s a side-by-side comparison of varying driver BAC levels and fatalities in Florida:

Blood-Alcohol ContentBAC = .01BAC = .08BAC = .15
Florida Fatalties (2017)974839560
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These NHTSA statistics show that Florida drivers with a BAC of .01 were involved in 974 fatal crashes in 2017 – much higher than drivers with higher BACs of .08 (839 fatalities) and .15 (560 fatalities).

Indeed, these figures serve as a reminder of the painful effects drunk driving can have on families and on communities. It’s why Driving Under the Influence is considered such a serious crime, with serious consequences.

What are the consequences of a DUI in Florida?

First-time DUI offenders in Florida can expect the following:

  • License suspension of six months to a year
  • Jail time ranging from eight hours to five years, depending on the BAC and the severity of the crash
  • Fines of $500-$1,000 ($1000-$2000 with a BAC of .15 or higher, or passengers under 18)
  • Probation (typically, the combination probation time and time in jail can’t exceed one year)
  • At least 50 hours of community service
  • Ignition Interlock Devices (IID) can be ordered for BACs exceeding .08. They are mandatory with a BAC of .15 or more, or with passengers under 18
  • Vehicle Impoundment for 10 days, unless the family has no other transportation

Finally, here’s an overview of first, second, and third offense DUI penalties in Florida:

Florida DUI LawsDetails
BAC Limit0.08
High BAC Limit0.15
1st Offense -
Licesnse Suspension
180 days minimum;
up to 1 year
1st Offense - Imprisonment8hrs minimum, but not more than 6 months;
With high BAC or minor in car, not more than 9 months;
For a first conviction, total period of probabation and incarceration may not exceed 1 year
1st Offense - Fine$500-$1000;
High BAC or minor in car, $1000-$2000
2nd Offense -
Driver's License Suspension
2nd in 5 years - min 5 year revocation;
2nd in 6+ years, min 180 days up to 1 year revocation
2nd Offense - ImprisonmentNot more than 9 months;
With high BAC or minor in car, not more than 12 months;
If 2nd in 5 years, mandatory imprisonment at least 10 days
with 48 hours consecutive confinement
2nd Offense -
Fine
$1000-$2000;
High BAC or minor in car, $2000-$4000
3rd Offense -
DL Suspension
3rd in 10 years of 2nd conviction - min 10 year revocation;
May be eligible for hardship reinstatement after 2 years
3rd Offense - Imprisonmentif 3rd in 10 years, mandatory 30 days with 48 consecutive hours; if 3rd in over 10 years, imprisonment for not more than 12 months
3rd Offense - FineMore than 10 years from 2nd conviction: $2000-$5000;
High BAC or minor in car, $4000 min
Mandatory InterlockHigh BAC and repeat offenders
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It’s clear that as drivers earn multiple DUI convictions, the consequences go from stiff to even more stiff:

  • Fines between first, second and third-time offenses increase exponentially, going from $500 to $1,000 for a first offense, to as much as $5,000 for a third offense.
  • Time behind bars also increases, going from an eight-hour minimum for a first-time offense, to a max of ten years for a third-time offense.
  • Finally, driver’s license suspensions can range from six months for a first-time offense, all the way to ten years for a third-time offense.

FR-44 Car Insurance in Virginia

For drivers in the state of Virginia, the change came in January 2008. Drivers facing certain convictions after January 1st would need to have an FR-44 with increased liability limits filed with their insurance policy.

Here’s a look at what violations call for SR-22 and an FR-44, according to the state’s Department of Motor Vehicles:

When Virginia Drivers Need an SR-22When Virginia Drivers Need an FR-44
- Unsatisfied judgements
- Uninsured motor vehicle suspension
- Failure to provide proof of insurance associated with insurance monitoring
- Falsifying insurance certification
- Driver license suspension as a result of a conviction for specific violations
- Maiming while under the influence
- Driving while under the influence of intoxicants or drugs
- Driving while the driver's license has been forfeited for a conviction, or finding of not innocent in the case of a juvenile
- Violation of the provisions of any federal law, law of any other state, or any valid local ordinance similar to the above
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To elaborate, Virginia drivers will need an SR-22 for:

  • Unsatisfied judgments
  • Uninsured motor vehicle suspension
  • Failure to provide proof of insurance associated with insurance monitoring
  • Falsifying insurance certification
  • Driver license suspension as a result of a conviction for specific violations

On the other hand, Virginia drivers will need an FR-44 for:

  • Maiming while under the influence
  • Driving while under the influence of intoxicants or drugs
  • Driving while the driver’s license has been forfeited for a conviction, or finding of not innocent in the case of a juvenile
  • Violation of the provisions of any federal law, law of any other state, or any valid local ordinance similar to the above

How do I get an FR-44 in Virginia?

Here’s the deal — a first conviction for a DUI in Virginia comes with a one-year license revocation period. However, you may be able to petition the court for restricted driving privileges during this time frame. If you are granted a restricted license during your revocation period, you won’t be able to drive unless you have an FR-44 on file with your auto insurance policy.

If you don’t begin driving until after your revocation period, you’ll need an FR-44 to have your privileges reinstated.

Virginia FR 44 Form screengrab

Getting your Virginia FR-44 begins by contacting your insurance provider. Your FR-44 form must be submitted by your insurance company to the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles. Filing costs for an FR-44 will typically range from $15-$35 and state code mandates that Virginia drivers must keep their FR-44 on file for three years.

However, if you successfully obtain a restricted license during your one-year revocation period, you will need an FR-44 for that time period too — making for a total of four years.

Keep in mind, having an FR-44 filed with your insurance policy is just the beginning. Virginia drivers with DUI convictions must also be prepared for stricter requirements and higher costs.

What are the FR-44 liability requirements in Virginia?

The minimum liability insurance requirements for Virginia drivers with an FR-44 are as follows:

Virginia FR-44
Minimum Liability Requirements
Amounts
Bodily Injury Liability
$50,000 per person
$100,000 per accident
Property Damage Liability$40,000
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To elaborate, these liability requirements include:

  • $50,000 in Bodily Injury Liability Coverage for another person’s injuries or death in an accident that you caused, up to the policy’s limits
  • $100,000 in Bodily Injury Liability per accident.
  • $40,000 in Property Damage Liability for property that was damaged in an accident that you caused

If you think these levels seem higher than what the state normally requires of its drivers, you’re correct:

Virginia FR-44 vs. SR-22 Liability Auto Insurance Coverage Requirements
Types of Liability Coverage RequiredVirginia SR-22 Minimum Liability Requirements
(same as state minimum requirements)
Virginia FR-44
Minimum Liability Requirements
Bodily injury/death per person$25,000
$50,000
Bodily injury/death per accident$50,000$100,000
Property damage$20,000$40,000
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This side-by-side comparison clearly shows that the minimums required of an FR-44 (50/100/40) are two times higher than what the state requires for all drivers (25/50/20), including those driving with SR-22s.

Virginia drivers requiring an FR-44 will also need to remember this:

Virginia insurers will typically require drivers with FR-44s pay their policies up front and in full.

Any move to revoke or modify your policy will result in your insurer notifying the DMV. In doing so, you can face license suspension, fines, and an extension of required FR-44 coverage.

How much is FR-44 insurance in Virginia?

Virginia drivers who need more reason not to drink and drive, remember that a DUI conviction will undoubtedly cause your auto insurance rates to go up, especially now that you’re considered a high-risk driver.

We once again turn to Quadrant data to compare rates among Virginia drivers with one DUI and drivers with a clean record:

Insurance ProviderClean RecordWith One DUI
Allstate$2,532.44$3,705.98
GEICO$1,565.25$3,083.13
Nationwide$1,802.52$2,641.55
Progressive$2,134.65$2,547.17
State Farm$2,071.20$2,268.92
USAA$1,439.41$2,468.83
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On average, Virginia drivers can expect to see an $861.69 increase (or a 48.4 percent hike) in rates as they go from having a clean record to one DUI. Drivers with Allstate, Geico, and USAA can all expect average increases in the thousand-dollar range.

The company charging the highest average rate for Virginia drivers with one DUI conviction is Allstate, at $3,705.98. The company charging the lowest rate is USAA, at $2,468.83.

The highest overall increase can be seen with Geico, whose drivers see an average $1,517.88, or 97 percent hike. On the flip side, drivers insured with State Farm see the smallest average increase at $197.72, or 9.5 percent.

How long do you keep FR-44 insurance in Virginia?

As a reminder, an FR-44 is to remain on file with the DMV for three years. The requirement is four years for drivers granted a restricted license during their one-year revocation period.

You must maintain your policy and required FR-44 for the entire duration that it’s required.

Not doing so can lead to another license suspension, fines, and a longer period of time that you’re required to have an FR-44.

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DUI Statistics in Virginia

When it comes to drinking and driving in Virginia, the Department of Motor Vehicles reports a disturbing trend — an increase of alcohol-related fatal crashes from 2017 to 2018.

The startling numbers are examined in the news report below:

But there’s more.

According to the NHTSA, Virginia ranked 16th in the nation in alcohol-impaired driving fatalities in 2017, with 246.

Here’s a look at how Virginia compared to the rest of the nation in DUI arrests and fatalities in 2017:

DUIs in Virginia: An OverviewDetails
Total DUI Arrests19,323 (Virginia)
1,017,808 (National)
Alcohol-Impaired Driving Fatalities
per 100K population
2.9 (Virginia)
3.4 (National)
Total Alcohol-Impaired Driving Fatalities
BAC = .08
246 (Virginia)
10,874 (National)
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From this data, we know that:

  • More than 19,000 drivers in Virginia were arrested for DUIs in 2017.
  • There were 2.9 alcohol-impaired driving fatalities per 100,000 people in the state, lower than the national average of 3.4 fatalities per 100,000 people.
  • There were a total of 246 alcohol-impaired driving fatalities.

NHTSA data additionally reveals that the number of alcohol-impaired driving fatalities in Virginia was highest among drivers with a lower BAC:

Blood-Alcohol ContentBAC = .01BAC = .08BAC = .15
Virginia Fatalties (2017)279246169
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This table demonstrates that Virginia drivers with a BAC of .01 were involved in 279 fatal crashes in 2017. This is higher than drivers who had BACs of .08 (246 fatalities) and of .15 (169 fatalities).

What are the consequences of a DUI in Virginia?

Without a doubt, the penalties for DUIs in Virginia are stiff. First-time DUI offenders in Virginia can expect:

  • An immediate seven-day license suspension for a BAC of at least .08
  • A DUI conviction will result in a one-year suspension
  • A maximum jail sentence of one year
  • Offenders with a BAC of .15 to .2 will serve a five-day minimum sentence before being eligible for probation
  • Drivers with BAC higher than .2 must serve a minimum of 10 days before being eligible for probation
  • Drivers who had passengers under 18 will serve an additional five days’ jail time
  • Completion of the Virginia Alcohol Safety Action Program (VASAP) will be required, at an estimated cost of $250 to $300 to the driver
  • Drivers enrolled in VASAP are eligible for a restricted license, which requires the installation of an Ignition Interlock Device (IID)
  • Fines of $250 to $2,500, plus court costs

Here’s an overview of first, second, and third offense DUI penalties in Virginia:

Virginia DUI LawsDetails
BAC Limit0.08
High BAC Limit0.15; 0.2
1st Offense -
Driver's License Suspension
1 year; restricted permit possible
1st Offense - ImprisonmentUp to 1 year;
if BAC 0.15-0.19, mandatory 5 days;
If BAC .20+, mandatory 20 days
1st Offense - Fine$250 mandatory minimum
2nd Offense -
Driver's License Suspension
3 years; restricted permit possible
2nd Offense - Fine$500 mandatory min
2nd Offense - ImprisonmentUp to 1 year;
Within 5 years 1st offense, mandatory 20 day minimum;
Within 10 years 1st offense, mandatory 10 additional days;
If BAC .20+ mandatory 20 additional days
3rd Offense -
Driver's License Suspension
Indefinite, but can petition court after 5 years
3rd Offense - Imprisonment1-5 years;
If within 5 years of 1st offense, 6-month mandatory min,
If within 10 years of 1st offense, 90-day mandatory minimum
3rd Offense - Fine$1000 mandatory minimum
Mandatory Interlockall offenders
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As Virginia drivers are convicted of first, second, and third DUI offenses, we see the consequences increase.

  • Fines range from a minimum of $250 for a first-time offense to a $500-minimum for a second-time offense to a $1,000-minimum for a third-time offense.
  • Where the maximum time of imprisonment for first- and second-time offenders is one year, the maximum time of imprisonment for third-time offenders is indefinite.
  • Finally, driver’s license suspension periods are one year for first-time offenders, three years for second-time offenders, and indefinite for third-time offenders (with the possibility of petitioning the court after five years).

Maintaining Car Insurance With an FR-44

Having a DUI on your record will raise an immediate red flag with your insurer — to the point where they may decide to drop you as a customer. That is because now, you’re considered a “high-risk” driver.

As a result, drivers requiring an FR-44 may need to shop multiple providers before finding one that is willing to insure them.

But here’s what’s important to remember — in spite of your conviction, insurance is still a legal requirement, and you can still get car insurance.

How do I get high-risk car insurance with a DUI conviction?

When it comes to the types of drivers that car insurance companies insure, there are three major categories:

  • Preferred customers, or those with a good driving record
  • Standard customers, or average vehicle owners
  • Non-standard customers, or those who are considered the greatest risk

Drivers who have been convicted of a DUI fall into the non-standard category. However, not all providers will insure non-standard customers. In these instances, drivers may need to seek out companies that provide high-risk insurance, which is also known as non-standard insurance.

Assigned Risk Car Insurance

Florida and Virginia drivers who still can’t find a company willing to insure them may need to seek out their state’s assigned risk insurance pool.

Assigned-risk insurance pools are managed by the state, with regulators requiring companies to pool together and provide insurance for high-risk drivers.

Keep in mind, this form of insurance is very expensive. Most assigned-risk pools will ask that drivers exhaust all their options possible before applying.

Florida’s Assigned Risk Auto Insurance

Florida drivers having difficulty getting insured can turn to the Florida Automobile Joint Underwriting Association (FAJUA).  To learn more about FAJUA and its providers, you can visit their website by clicking here or contact FAJUA offices by phone at (800) 827-6370 or in person Monday through Friday, 8:15 a.m. – 4:15 p.m. ET.

Virginia’s Assigned Risk Auto Insurance

The Virginia Automobile Insurance Plan (VAIP) exists to help high-risk drivers obtain insurance. Those who have a valid Virginia driver’s license and have a vehicle registered in the state are eligible to be assigned through VAIP.

For more information, drivers should speak to an agent or broker or call (888) 820-0170. They can also visit in person Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m – 4:00 p.m. ET.

Non-Owners FR-44 Car Insurance

Here’s the deal — Florida and Virginia drivers who are asked to have an FR-44, but don’t have a vehicle registered in their name, must still maintain insurance coverage. That’s because as long as you’re driving, you must be insured.

Meeting these requirements can be accomplished by getting a non-owners insurance policy.

Non-owners insurance is liability-only coverage, and is meant to protect those driving a car they don’t own, like that of a friend’s or relative’s.

Keep in mind, because non-owners insurance is liability-only, it will not provide coverage for any damages done to the vehicle you’re driving. It will only apply to damages or injuries caused to another person, vehicle, or property while you were driving.

Drivers with non-owners insurance will need to make sure their policies meet the requirements of an FR-44. Following the procedures will be the same; simply notify your insurer to begin the process.

How can I save on car insurance after a DUI?

One of the best ways to save on car insurance as a high-risk driver will be to shop around and get multiple quotes.

At the end of the day, each insurer is different and will take in different considerations. Therefore, it’s always in your best interest to talk to an agent and ask a lot of questions.

Other ways you can save on your insurance include:

  • Taking a defensive driving course. You’ll specifically want to look for courses that are eligible for discounts on your policy.
  • Trading in newer, sportier cars for safer vehicles. A car that is considered to be “safe” may result in lower rates.
  • Going without a car for a season. Instead, consider purchasing non-owners car insurance, and take advantage of carpooling and public transportation.
  • Looking for discounts. This could include bundling policies, low-mileage, good student, multi-car policies, and anti-lock brakes — just to name a few.
  • Calling your insurance company once your violation period expires to see if they will reduce your rates.
  • Never skipping any payments, or allowing your coverage to lapse. This will be especially tempting in light of higher rates. However, doing so will only result in more fines and license suspension.

FR-44 Insurance: The Bottom Line

Whether you live in Florida or Virginia, drivers with an FR-44 will need to remain diligent.

Pursue finding an insurance provider that will sell you coverage, so you can remain in compliance with the law. Ensure your FR-44 form will be submitted on time, and you meet all of the necessary liability requirements.

Work with your agent to make sure you don’t miss any payments and that you don’t allow your coverage to lapse. Diligently take time to become a better, safer, trustworthy driver. Never drink and drive.

Remember, FR-44’s aren’t designed to remain on your record forever. Once your violation period has cleared, you start over with a new slate.

You can begin your search for the best car insurance rates by using our free high-risk car insurance comparison tool. Just enter your zip code here to start.

References:

  1. https://www.iii.org/article/what-if-i-cant-find-auto-coverage
  2. https://www.drivinglaws.org/sr-22-overview.html
  3. https://www.flhsmv.gov/pdf/frmanual/bulletin-12-19-07.pdf
  4. http://www.leg.state.fl.us/statutes/index.cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&URL=0300-0399/0324/Sections/0324.023.html
  5. https://www.iicmva.com/FRguide2015Final.pdf
  6. https://www.flhsmv.gov/driver-licenses-id-cards/education-courses/dui-and-iid/florida-dui-administrative-suspension-laws/
  7. https://criminaldefenseattorneytampa.com/dui/penalties/fr-44-insurance/
  8. https://www.flhsmv.gov/pdf/frmanual/ftp-procedure-manual.pdf
  9. https://www.flhsmv.gov/insurance/
  10. http://www.leg.state.fl.us/statutes/index.cfm?mode=View%20Statutes&SubMenu=1&App_mode=Display_Statute&Search_String=324.023&URL=0300-0399/0324/Sections/0324.023.html
  11. https://www.meldonlaw.com/faqs/is-bodily-injury-liability-insurance-required-in-florida/
  12. https://www.iii.org/fact-statistic/facts-statistics-uninsured-motorists
  13. https://thelawdictionary.org/article/where-can-i-find-cheap-fr-44-insurance-in-florida/
  14. https://thelawdictionary.org/
  15. https://www.nhtsa.gov/
  16. https://crashstats.nhtsa.dot.gov/Api/Public/ViewPublication/812630
  17. https://www.responsibility.org/alcohol-statistics/state-map/state/florida/
  18. https://dui.drivinglaws.org/resources/first-offense-dui-florida.htm
  19. https://law.lis.virginia.gov/vacode/title46.2/chapter3/section46.2-316/
  20. https://www.dmv.virginia.gov/commercial/#insurance/certifications.asp
  21. https://www.dmv.virginia.gov/drivers/#restrict_privs.asp
  22. https://www.tuckerlawpllc.com/faqs/sr-22-and-fr-44-insurance-after-dui-or-traffic-ticket.cfm
  23. https://www.dmv.virginia.gov/safety/crash_data/crash_facts/crash_facts_18.pdf
  24. https://www.responsibility.org/alcohol-statistics/state-map/state/virginia/
  25. https://dui.drivinglaws.org/resources/virginia-first-offense-dui.htm
  26. https://www.floir.com/
  27. https://www.scc.virginia.gov/boi/
  28. https://www.aipso.com/Plan-Sites/Virginia
  29. https://www.vaduilawyer.com/dwi-dui-manual/chapter-2-dwi-punishment/fr-44-insurance

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