Elijah Black is a Greenville, South Carolina native with a B.A. English from Coastal Carolina University. He is a fiction writer and also works as a freelance writer and editor. He’s worked as a Production Assistant for WYFF 4 and has been published in several publications and websites across the United States.

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Rachael Brennan has been working in the insurance industry since 2006 when she began working as a licensed insurance representative for 21st Century Insurance, during which time she earned her Property and Casualty license in all 50 states. After several years she expanded her insurance expertise, earning her license in Health and AD&D insurance as well. She has worked for small health in...

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Reviewed by Rachael Brennan
Licensed Auto Insurance Agent

UPDATED: May 26, 2021

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Don't Forget These Facts

  • Laws for restricted licenses vary from state to state
  • You’ll have to prove that being unable to drive is a substantial hardship in order to get a restricted license
  • Restricted licenses do not come with all the privileges of regular licenses

DUIs are serious business. If you’re convicted of a DUI, you’ll likely have your license suspended and need SR22 insurance. But if you still need to drive to work or take your kids to school, you may be wondering how to get a restricted license after DUI suspension.

Laws vary by state, but it is possible to get a restricted license after DUI suspension if you can prove you need to drive in order to work, make medical appointments, or take your kids to school, among other reasons.

Keep reading below to learn how to get a restricted license, what you can do with a restricted license, and who’s eligible for one. But before you do, enter your ZIP code into our free comparison tool above to find affordable SR22 insurance near you.

How do I get a restricted license after DUI suspension?

Wondering how to get a permit to drive to work on a suspended license? Well, procedures vary from state to state, but you’ll likely have to apply for one through your state department of motor vehicles.

However, if you’re wondering how to get a restricted license to drive to work, keep in mind that getting a restricted license isn’t easy.

You’ll have to prove that being unable to drive is a substantial hardship for you and that public transportation is not an option for you. Even then you may not get approved.

Some states, like Tennessee, may even charge you a restricted license fee, so you’ll have to be prepared to pay this. If you were convicted of a DUI, some states may require you to install an ignition interlock device in your vehicle before they will approve your restricted license. According to the CDC, the use of interlock devices has shown to decrease the number of repeat DUIs.

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What can you do with a restricted license?

Now that you know how to get a restricted license after DUI license suspension, you’re probably wondering what you can do with a restricted license.

Well, a restricted license won’t give you all the privileges of a regular license. Restricted licenses come with conditions that dictate when and/or where you can drive.

Conditions vary by state, but generally, you’ll only be able to get a restricted license if you need to drive to work, school, alcohol or drug treatment programs, and medical appointments. Some states may even allow you to drive your kids to school.

In some cases, the state may even specify when you’re allowed to drive. For example, a restricted license may only allow you to drive in the daytime or between regular work hours.

Who’s eligible for a restricted license?

You now know how to get a restricted license after DUI license suspension and what you can do with a restricted license. But how do you know if you’re eligible for a restricted license?

Well, each state is different, but generally, there are three things that will influence your ability to get a restricted license: the reason for your suspension, your driving record, and the license type.

DUIs aren’t the only reasons people have their licenses suspended. If you have your license suspended for reckless driving or a hit-and-run, your state may prohibit you from getting a restricted license.

In some cases, you may be eligible for a restricted license for your first offense only. If you get a second offense, you may no longer be eligible for a restricted license.

You also want to avoid getting pulled over on a restricted license. If you get an offense while driving on a restricted license you could lose your restricted license and face a potentially longer suspension time.

Now that you know how to get a restricted license after DUI license suspension, you’ll need to find SR22 insurance as well. It may seem difficult, but you can find cheap SR22 insurance by comparing SR22 insurance quotes from multiple companies.

Ready to buy? Simply enter your ZIP code into our free comparison tool below to buy SR22 auto insurance from providers near you.